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TPS Release

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rprevost View Drop Down
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    Posted: 15 October 2006 at 11:34pm
Most of the discussion between the rotary release and the slap/hinge release has been in the context of the OPS.  Is the information as discussed also applicable to the TPS?  I think that I naturally use a slap/hinge release, where I tend to release early causing very high or bladed shots.  I would like to learn to release using a rotary move but not sure exactly how to do it.  The few times I have tried to rotate my hands through the ball, the ball went 45 degrees to the left; I came right over the top.  Any suggestions fellows?
 
RP
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote One Planer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 October 2006 at 8:32am
Originally posted by rprevost rprevost wrote:

Most of the discussion between the rotary release and the slap/hinge release has been in the context of the OPS.  Is the information as discussed also applicable to the TPS?  I think that I naturally use a slap/hinge release, where I tend to release early causing very high or bladed shots.  I would like to learn to release using a rotary move but not sure exactly how to do it.  The few times I have tried to rotate my hands through the ball, the ball went 45 degrees to the left; I came right over the top.  Any suggestions fellows?
 
RP


RP, It's been a while since I was trying to be a two-planer, but what I remember doing in those days was using left side resistance to force the right side to release through the ball.  It's the old thing about "hitting into a firm left side" by keeping the shoulders closed to the line deep into the downswing and slowing the left arm at impact to force the momentum of the right arm and side to release through it.  My mental image was to think of the left side as a "wall" that the right side had to "bust thrrough" to release the clubhead.

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Lefty View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lefty Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 October 2006 at 12:50pm
RP,
 
Uno's on the money with this. Keep your back to the target, let the arms drop and power the swing with the legs/hips and you'll find that the forearms will want to very naturally crossover (assuming you let them by having a light enough grip). No need to manipulate anything. The big difference is that at impact, your shoulders will be parallel to the target line - to me, they feel closed - with the hips more open. I always felt like I was holding back the upper body, too. The swing goes in-to-out, so if you're a rightie, you're swinging to right field to hit it to centre-field. Because of this, it's always felt more like a draw swing to me. It's a beautiful way to swing though less reliable for me as I tended to get "stuck", ie, hip kicking in to the ball, back shoulder tilting down, club off plane, hands unable to get into position, hooks (if I tried to save the shot) and more often, big, high blocks. Also, remember to let the club "go" into a big, high finish.
 
Good luck,
 
Lefty
 
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MeltDownZ View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MeltDownZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 January 2007 at 4:11pm

RP,

A couple of tips for a 2 planer to get rid of the early release:
 
- Get to your left side.  Specifically, I feel I am standing on my left foot at impact.  If you are not on your left foot at impact, than your weight is too far behind the ball and you will 'reach' with your right hand causing that nasty scooping release.
 
- Your club must be traveling straight through the impact zone or slightly in to out with the release feeling like its about 8" past the ball.  If not, your left wrist will collapse near impact as the club comes from the outside in resulting in the classic chicken wing move. 
 
- Remember to continue swinging on plane after impact.  Too many people immediately swing under or left of plane just after impact.  This is closely related to the item above.  It's a result of a heave or yank with the left side completely bypassing the natural release of the 2 plane swing.  Remember, weight on left, stay behind ball at impact, swing up on plane after impact.
 
- Rotate the right side through impact to avoid running out of right arm.  In the 2 plane swing, the left arm must swing free through impact.  If you do not rotate adequately, you will run out of right arm and must reach.  The manual intervention with the right arm becomes a total power leak for the 2 plane swing.  Remember, with the 2 plane swing the body turn is simpathetic, not powerful.  Go with the flow with the intention of stopping at 1 o'clock.  This will help you create the nice 2 plane release and not turn right past it.
 
- Wrist action - remember the greater the wrist action, the greater the 'scooping' action at impact.  Experiment with slightly less wrist action in the backswing and see the effect on your release action.  While you're thinking about wrists, try not to let your wrist breakdown at the top (bend backwards).  A flatter wrist promotes an onplane move from the top.
 
- Practice swinging just over a tee without a ball.  Ensure that your clubhead is swinging ever so slightly in to out through impact and the release is absolutely smooth without manipulation, pulls, or tugs.
 
Regarding the right arm rotation during release.  Don't confuse this with an intentional act... it's not.  As you swing through the release, slightly in to out with a smoothly following right side, your right arm reaches the as far as it can about 8" past impact.  This straightens it.  At the same time, the left arm is is beginning to hinge.  This smooth transition gives the illusion that you are intentionally rotating them.  Rather, this is the very natural result of your arms accomidating the natural on plane swing of the club.


Edited by MeltDownZ - 19 January 2007 at 4:54pm
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