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What method for removing shafts

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jymetalwood View Drop Down
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    Posted: 05 December 2008 at 1:13pm
HI Group:

I'm looking for the system which will do the least damage.  I have tried a heat gun and couldnt get enough heat, I presume.  I have a spring loaded puller.

I now use a regular Propane torch, this usually burns off some of the paint and discolors the head.

What do the Pros (Chuck) use successfully.?

Joe

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LowPost42 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LowPost42 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 December 2008 at 2:55pm
You say spring loaded - what do you mean?  You tension a spring against a pusher?
 
I and many other clubmakers swear by hydraulic pullers - basically a clamp and a pushing plate welded to a bottle jack.  It makes short work of bore through heads, ensures a clean, straight pull, and applies a ton (or 3) of pressure to ensure as little heat as possible is necessary to pull the head.
 
 
Part of it could be your technique.
 
Rule 1:  Keep the heat moving.  I use a standard propane (plumbers) torch.  Other guys are in love with the micro-butane torch, but I don't see a need for it, yet.  Never leave the flame in one spot for too long.  Personally, I like to put heads in the puller toe down (or angled away from me about 15 degrees) so that I can heat the most hosel without touching the crown.  I'll heat the back of the hosel for a 3 count, constantly moving the flame (inner, dark blue flame on the hosel), then I'll heat 180 for a 3 count (again, constant movement) then 'rest' for a 10 count or so, letting the heat penetrate.  Then I'll move 90 from my last heat, do a 3 count, move another 180 and do a 3 count and rest again.  Most times this is sufficient to break the bond.  For wood heads I'll use less heat on the painted hosel and more heat (gently and quickly) along the face and sole.  Too much heat on the sole will liquefy the rattle stop and it'll run to the low point on your head.  Again, I'm using the unpainted metal as a heat sink for the hosel.  As you've seen, too much heat scorches the paint.  I only use my heat gun to warm up buildup tape when I'm regripping a set.
 
Rule #2:  Pressure is your friend.  Most shops have either a screw-type puller or a JB Hydraulic (note:  JB has been threatened by Dick Weiss and no longer makes his puller, but there are other bottle jack hydraulic pullers you can find on eBay).  The more pretensioning you can get on your head, the better - you'll know when you've applied enough heat as the tension will break.  In the JB Pro model, there's a pretension bolt that I use as my guide.
 
Rule #3:  I've said it before, but it's worth repeating.  Keep the heat moving.  If, for some stupid reason, you wanted to use the torch to warm up your hand, you certainly wouldn't simply leave it on one spot - you'd wave it over your hand to avoid being burnt!  Same theory applie here, the difference being metal can take more heat than your hand.  ;)  Also, if you get too aggressive (or distracted) you can use any polish (chrome polish for chromed heads, Stainless steel polish for stainless heads) to get the bluing out.  I use blue away.  The ammonia smell knocks me off my feet, but it does a great job.
 
Finally, please remember that under no circumstances should you twist the head off a graphite shaft.  The heat that breaks down shafting epoxy will also break down the epoxy resin that holds the graphite fibers together in the shaft - twisting the head also twists the shaft, making it useless for another club (but it's fine for tomatoes).
 
Steel shaft?  You could simply hit it with the heat until you see a 'puff' and smell the burnt epoxy, then twist it off with your gloved hand.  (Or put it under your shoe and pull).
 
Remember, warm epoxy cleans up easier than cold!
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jymetalwood View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jymetalwood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 December 2008 at 4:37pm

Hi Ben:
Thanks for the quick and very informative reply.
My puller is is a spring loaded device.  One ended rest against the vise and clamped shaft, the other end is applying pressure to the head.  (Built for me by my neighbour).

I will look at a different puller.

THANKS AGAIN

Joe
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LowPost42 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LowPost42 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 December 2008 at 5:00pm
The thing about hydraulic pullers is that they're a little pricey.  But with a good clamp, they'll last you forever.  It's why I bought one.  Plus, there's no 'constant cranking' - just 3 or 4 pumps to load, and heat.  Sure, once the epoxy breaks you pump the head off, but at least you don't have to keep applying more and more pressure pre-break.
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jymetalwood View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jymetalwood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 December 2008 at 5:43pm
MY puller is similiar to this one on Ebay, except mine has two springs on it.

280290504758
Joe
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